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  1. Welcome, This site is in the process of trying to develop a reliable knowledge base for VMware technology. Its content will gradually expand into other interdisciplinary aspects of virtualization such as cyber security. Eventually there will be a focus on the technologies that virtualization enables, delivering full-stack research and tutorials for hybrid cloud architecture, data science, IoT, and cognitive machine learning. Why VMware and not Citrix or other alternatives? I work full-time as a VMware admin and so admittedly speak from bias, however I am passionate about networking and strongly believe in the potential of NSX along with the general capacity of vSphere to virtualize the network layer. As of 2016, skill in network virtualization is extremely rare and something that will only be sought with increasing demand. It also takes two of the most elusive hard-to-explain concepts, networking and virtualization, and fuses them into a truly abstract challenge. Coming from a philosophy background, I accept this challenge and so will proceed to build this research platform in an attempt to better-understand it. Wait, philosophy? What does that have to do with anything? I'm glad you asked. My favorite way to approach a new complex system is by asking: "How would I do it if I had to make it myself?" This is something that I am very bad at explaining but that fascinates me beyond measure nonetheless. With that disclaimer, here I go: If we take what we do not know, and then ask ourselves how we would have designed and deployed this unknown if it were up to us, then we may very quickly end up with something similar to that unknown which we recently did not understand. I attribute this thinking to Nicholas of Cusa who championed the idea of "learned ignorance" back in the early 1400s. Learned ignorance is a science of training the mind to begin by being absolutely sure of what it does not understand, and then builds from there. None of us know exactly how the Internet of Things will be able to manage all the data or precisely how software-defined networking will come to the rescue. But by learning what's already out there and following the trends, we can speculate on how things need to be as they roll out. And by understanding how things should develop as we move toward the future, we will be ready for disruptive technologies as they form rather than be broadsided by them. One last thing, if you see members running around who purport to be "Virtual Members", don't mind them as they are a fictitious staff which helps me to explore issues from many perspectives. I like to call this a communal dialectic, where a group of competing perspectives negotiate and battle with each other until they find something better. This is a very simple website that is optimized for mobile browsing, and so my hope is that seeing posts from an eclectic group based on world-historical thinkers, fiction, and some that I plain made up would be much less dull than the same avatar posting all day. This site is starting to take off as of April 2017. Expect plenty of new content in the next few months but please be patient as it gets started. I hope that you can make yourself at home here. Aloha, Eric Allione